Thursday, November 10, 2011

Log Cabins...




Bill V. at willywonkyquilts blog is part of a quilt study group in Oregon. This weekend they are going to look at log cabin quilts. Try as I might I could not get facebook to post photos of my quilts in the right spot so he could see them...so irritating!


So as I try to figure out my new computer and finicky facebook all get to see them....

This is 1/4 of the quilt. What is interesting about this one is the half-square triangles used in the center block, the "frugal" piecing of the log strips (piecing together scraps), and the pieced border with the star blocks in the corners. The edge is finished front to back. The log cabin blocks have some very early fabrics and seem to be a bit earlier than the border fabrics. The quilt is in fair condition. I purchased it on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Courthouse steps baby quilt is circa 1900 and is from the Pennsylvania area.
This type of "quilt" is often referred to as a summer spread since it has not batting (so technically not a quilt.) Circa 1870, the red centers are wool and the log strips are done on a foundation fabric which are sewn together in the "quilt as you go" method. Everything old is new again...
This last top just screams Pennsylvania! At first I planned to use it as a donor top...providing fabric to do quilt restoration but then it grew on me....I could never cut into it! Bright and a little garish it is perfect to drape over the back of a chair at Christmas....



14 comments:

Karen said...

The colors on the last one is something I would think Pennsylvania at first look. A different color combo for a log cabin quilt.

Janet O. said...

I never tire of log cabin quilts. You've got some beauties here. I really like the HST in the centers of the first one.

Impera_Magna said...

Wow... beautiful quilts... the log cabin is fascinating... I think I could look at it for hours! I do love quilts with pieced strips and bits of fabric sewn together...

quiltmom said...

The first quilt that I ever made was a quilt in a day log cabin. Needless to say, it took a lot longer than a day. It is in pretty bad shape these days but I did love it so much so I have kept it - shredded or not..
The other one I made was with much smaller logs( one and a half inch ones. It was a fun quilt to make and it is owned by my niece and her husband.
I have often thought about making a courthouse step variation. Thanks for sharing your pretty pieces. The last one such is a different color combo..
Warmest regards,
Anna

The Civil War Quilter said...

Love them all, BUT that first one is a real treasure! So interesting with that pieced border. Never seen anything like it on a Log Cabin. I'm glad you shared these with us. Fantastic!

Willy Wonky said...

Wow! Gorgeous!!

Hey, I have a new web site:

http://www.willywonkyquilts.com

xoxo,
Bill

Victoria @ BUMBLE BEANS said...

i Love log cabins. I have a few antique ones, but have not yet made a whole quilt of them... it's the red squares that always make me fall in love with them... ;-) Great quilts!

Jan said...

These are some great log cabins! Love the pieced border with the star corner, and the big courthouse steps, oh, my!

Donna K from N.TX aka Quilting Bear Gal said...

So glad the pink red and yellow log cabin quilt grew on you and it was kept intact. It's a wild keeper.

MulticoloredPieces said...

Like your log cabins--one of my first quilts. Enjoyed your other quilting projects as well.
best from Tunisia,
nadia

Susan said...

Love that first scrappy one! Thank you for sharing the pics. The second one - I could see how it could grow on one, though not to my taste either. Still, difference is what makes quilts interesting! Among about 1000 other things. =)

Merilyn said...

I do love the log-cabin block!!! Lovely old quilts, thankyou for sharing them!! I agree the red/yellow would be a great Christmas backdrop over the holidays!

Tonya Ricucci said...

oh I love love love that last one. fabulous colors and so striking!

Janet said...

That post was a treat!! Love the stars in the corners.